This engineer is using old cell phones to stop illegal logging

old cell phones to stop illegal logging

This engineer is using old cell phones to stop illegal logging

 

 

When hiking in 2011 through Indonesia’s rainforest, White Topher stumbled upon an emission cutting a tree. The man worked a short distance from the guard station, but the sound of birds and insects buzzing darkened the sound of his chainsaw, keeping it hidden from view.
This gave a white idea. The San Francisco-based engineer dreamed of a device that could hear chainsaws and report their parking position to parking authorities.

Blanco, now 35 years old, learned that some parts of the rainforest have a notable mobile phone service. Cell towers abound, even when roads and power lines are rare. Locals can make calls and send text messages from the periphery of the illegal logging areas where they do their work.
In a subsequent trip to Indonesia, White has installed a handful of cell phones around a reservation gibbon. The phones would report park rangers when they heard the putter chainsaws. Shortly after the system was set up, White was notified by email of one of his phones. He told the Rangers, who have followed the faint sound of a chainsaw in the woods. They caught a group of loggers on the spot.
White Topher installs a cell phone listening device.
White Topher installs a cell phone listening device.
Jungle connection

“In most cases, loggers and other criminals operate under the assumption that they will not be detected or captured,” White said. “When they are, the incentive to take risks is significantly reduced.”
Each mobile phone is protected by a plastic housing and powered by a small solar system. A microphone records sensitive sounds of the jungle, which is sent to the cloud for analysis. When you hear a chainsaw, send a text or email to the authorities.
While experts have called for the use of drones and satellites to control illegal logging, these technologies generally do not allow authorities to react in real-time. The listening devices are warning of white guards indicate instantly and in the scene.
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Jungle connection
Its technology has been of great value for conservation efforts. Record scar landscapes, destroy habitats and contribute to climate change. Carbon scrub from the sky and store it in its leaves and branches. When loggers cut a tree, they eliminate a potent carbon sink. Over time, this can add up. Deforestation contributes more to climate change than all cars and trucks on Earth. Illegal logging accounts for up to 90% of tropical deforestation.
“Illegal loggers usually refer to specific high-value tree species in the interior, cutting wide dirt roads in the forest to extract trunks by truck,” White said. “These roads open the otherwise impenetrable wood for even more destructive exploitation, such as colonization, poaching and possibly burning and the elimination of forests for agriculture.”

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